JULIA KRISTEVA

Exit

Julia Kristeva
 

 

 

Thinking with Julia Kristeva
La Maison Française of New York University

On the occasion of the publication of The Philosophy of Julia Kristeva, ed. Sara G. Beardsworth, in The Library of Living Philosophers, Open Court Publishing Company, 2020 and of At the Risk of Thinking: An Intellectual Biography of Julia Kristeva, by Alice Jardine, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020.

Participants: François Noudelmann, Kelly Oliver, Alice Jardine, Noelle McAfee, Maria Margaroni, John Lechte, Lauren Guilmette, Karen Mock, Miglena Nikolchina, Emilia Angelova, David Uhrig, Samuel Dock, Ewa Ziarek, Fanny Söderbäck, Cecilia Sjöholm, Elaine Miller, Robert Harvey, Marian Hobson, Sarah Hansen, Rachel Boue, Julia Kristeva in conversation with François Noudelmann.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thinking with Julia Kristeva 

Conversation entre Julia Kristeva et François Noudelmann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

François Noudelmann: The fabulous book dedicated to your work has been published in the series The Library of Living Philosophers. When critics try to define you, they hesitate between psychoanalyst, semiotician, writer, and philosopher. Of course, you are all of these definitions and more, but could you say something about your identification with, or relationship to, philosophy? Even if there is not a single definition of philosophy, could you say what role it has played, through major or minor philosophical references, in your thinking?

Secondary question: There are not many women in philosophy. Does being a woman philosopher imply adopting a phallic writing?

 

Julia Kristeva: Dear François Noudelmann

First of all, before answering your question, thank you very much for receiving us by Zoom in the beautiful Maison Française that I have known now for half a century, and which you manage with great tact and energy. Special thanks to Kelly and Alice for organizing and holding this meeting with passion and vigilance. Thank you to all those who have spoken these last three hours. Your words, discussing and carrying my research forward, fill me with great emotion and gratitude. This has been a true experience of "thinking with” which sadly lacks in the anthropological acceleration imposed by today’s digital age and even more so by the pandemic.

I would like to thank the authors of the two books that bring us together today.

The extraordinary intelligence, precision and perseverance of Sara Gay Beardsworth, editor of the prestigious Library of Living Philosophers series, and of this volume of over 800 pages, in which thirty-six authors participated: philosophers, linguists, sociologists, anthropologists, without forgetting some eminent figures in the arts and letters, and politics as well.Your contributions, dear friends, your thoughts, praise or criticism, honor me, intimidate me and compel me. I am proud to be part of the prestigious Library of Living Philosophers series established in 1939, alongside the great names of philosophy who’ve inspired contemporary philosophical research: and especially to join the coterie of French philosophers honored by this series, namely Sartre, Ricoeur and Gabriel Marcel, being myself, now, one of the few women on the list.

At The Risk of Thinking by Alice Jardine, that patient and vigilant intellectual biography you dedicated to me, dear Alice, published by Bloomsbury Press, in which you invite me revisit, with great finesse and lucidity, my life and my research, my loves and my experience of motherhood. We have known each other since I began teaching at Columbia University’s Department of French and Romance Languages where you were my first American assistant. At the time professors Michael Rifleterre and Léon Roudiez headed the prestigious department, and of course, there was the faithful, unwavering presence of Columbia University Press, now run by Jenifer Crew, along with Lary Kritzman and his European perspective collection. It is thanks to them that my writing has been translated into English, and hence, become internationally accessible, which has made it possible for us to meet today. I can think of no better way to thank you, dear Alice, than to reveal the intimate side of our friendship to our friends here present, namely how you taught David Joyaux, my son with Philippe Sollers, how to sing "twinkle twinkle little star" the semester I was a permanent visiting professor at Columbia. He remembers it still. Today your book ends with a poem by David called “L’Ecriture."

 

 

*        

 

Let me come back to your question, dear François. I very much enjoyed reading your latest book Un tout autre Sartre (Gallimard, 2020), I very much enjoyed your Pensée avec les oreilles et les airs de famille: une philosophie des affinités, as well as Le toucher des philosophes: Sartre, Nietzsche et Barthes au piano. You have generously welcomed me to France Culture. We have often crossed paths at bookstores at the launch of our books, and I can say that no matter how different our trajectories may be, we are bound by an authentic “affinity," and this Zoom is a further confirmation of that.

I am not a certified professional philosopher. I still keep my student notebooks in French philology at the University of Sofia, into which I studiously copied pages upon pages from Voltaire’s Dictionnaire Philosophique, from Diderot's Jacques le Fatalisteand Le Neveu de Rameau and from La Nouvelle Héloïse, Le Contrat Social and Confessions by Rousseau. The French Enlightenment taught me that philosophy is inseparable from this unveiling of language and imagination we call “literature.” The “dialectical materialism” that we were taught did not stop with Marx’s Capital and Lenin's Philosophical Notebooks; I also read Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and continued to deepen my knowledge of his work in writing my thesis, Revolution in Poetic Language, which highlights a phrase from Phenomenology of Spirit: “What, therefore, is important in the study of Science, is that one should take on oneself the strenuous effort of the Notion.” Psychoanalysis was to teach me that "the strenuous effort of the Notion" is carried by the conscious and unconscious psycho-sexual investment.

 

I discovered Husserl in France; my Revolution in Poetic Language bears witness to this, and I discuss him as I develop my notions of the “semiotic” versus the “symbolic.” Marian Hobson examines this in the study she devotes to my research in the LLP volume.

I didn't know Freud; while rummaging through the family library, my sister discovered that my father had hidden at the very top, in the last row of the last shelf, up against the wall, the Bulgarian translation of Freud’s 1917 The Introduction to Psychoanalysis, translated into Bulgarian in 1947. Reading it was at the risk of becoming an enemy of the People! I discovered Freud from Lacan's seminars, led there by Philippe Sollers. It was also Sollers who got me to read Nietzsche.

This path was to lead me necessarily to the dismantling of ontotheology, at first closer to the transvaluation of values (Umwertung aller Werte) according to Nietzsche, and above all in the wake of post-war Heidegger to what he calls Verwinudung — which translates as “winning back,” or even “getting over.”

Attentive to Freud's "free association" and “transference," but also to literature, the interpretation I am trying to construct is not an “hermeneutic.” I seek to make "inner experience" heard in the sense of Georges Batailles, that is to say, as an "appropriation of life until death,” a “resisting withdrawal into oneself,” “identities,” and “limits." Could this be what the Jewish Kabbalah calls Techouva, the winning back or refounding of being?

The spawning (Bahnung in German) of thought thus understood is inseparable from writing in the sense that it absorbs the imaginary and implies transference. My neologisms (intertextuality, abjection, reliance, etc.) do not "subtitle" the "abstractions" that pre-exist them. I try to invite those I address to participate in the gestation of the idea, through what I call the flesh of words: drives, affects, sensations, emotions.

My early theoretical writings were more speculative. Following my own psycho-sexual maturation, and with psychoanalysis, my way of thinking now cohabits more explicitly with literary writing: academic exposition gives way to the essay, while psychoanalytical theorizing is supported by clinical vignettes where the words of the analysand and the analyst neither judge nor calculate but merely transform (as does the dream in Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams).

 

What do you call "phallic writing"? One that legislates, orders, sanctions, a kind of pure "symbolic" guaranteeing structure and truth? Writing as experience, a winning back, techouva, or refoundation is, to say the least, bisexual, at once structuring and polyphonic, a crossing of borders. The feminine of the man and the feminine of the woman participate and reveal themselves in it, but subordinated to a single refounding objective: singularity. In the sense Dun Scot (1266–1308) brought to light and which Hannah Arendt discovered in Heidegger's seminar. Singularity or Ecceitas: this man here, that woman there. In this regard, I would like to quote the conclusion from my trilogy Female Genius: "Each subject invents in his intimacy a specific sex,” let us call it singular. Thought or thinking, when it exists, makes this particularity, this singularity shareable.

*         

F.N.: Looking back on your work, we are very impressed by your power of thought. You have, in every theoretical field, in every kind of writing, invested maximum intensity: you go all the way, methodically, whether in language theory, in psychoanalytical interpretation, in the biographical understanding of a personality or a work of art... What libido sustains your endless desire to think, write and communicate? What is your engine, your fuel?

 

Secondary question: what determines your choice to write a theoretical essay or rather a novel?

 

J.K.: Maybe the fact that I don't recognize myself in this Kristeva you have just sketched in generous lines. I don't see myself in the image or the phenomenon because I travel within myself. But you can rephrase your question: why do you travel within yourself?

The "evidence based medicine,” which explains everything by "big data" would perhaps find that I have a "highly sensitive brain"? Freudian psychoanalysts will look toward the intensity of the drives and the capacity for sublimation, thanks to a successful Oedipus, with the double integration of  paternal and maternal poles. Indeed, the two books that bring us together today, my biography in conversation with Samuel Dock and the biography by Alice Jardine, mention these interminable family discussions, in which I fought my father's orthodox faith armed with my mother's Darwinism. My father was angry, but he also maintained that books are the only value; and that there is no other way to "emerge from the bowels of Hell" (a quote from the Gospels, he claimed, referring to our native Bulgaria) than to learn foreign languages. Communist education was severe, but solid, and I was lucky enough to be a teenager during the thaw, that is, de-Stalinization. Another good fortune: France, which welcomed me with a scholarship, was open to foreigner students and I didn’t experience any prejudice — be it xenophobic or antifeminist —  at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, the University or at Saint Germain des Prés where I joined Philippe Sollers and the Tel-Quel group. This hospitality has not spared me the rubs of French nationalism: my book Etrangers à nous même bears witness to my experience of the Foreigner (L’Etrangère is the title of the now famous article Barthes wrote about me). But I am convinced an Enlightenment spirit deeply inhabits the thinking of the French. And I am betting on this perpetual political debate which, all things considered, leaves room for the foreigner that I am and that I will remain. The proof: this Zoom is impossible in France; it is hosted at the Maison Française of ..... New York. Proof, if any, that I am deeply cosmopolitan: "I travel within myself,” but with you.  In the context of the pandemic, I call myself a sur-vivor. Not in the morbid sense of the term, but in the sense of what Freud called "the eternal Eros,” ending his Civilisation and Its Discontents.

To put it another way, this journey of mine, including exile, is supported by an eroticization of thought. Dare I say that thought thus understood as the flesh of words is a part of my sexual organs?

The novels? A nocturnal variation of thought bypass — what I call a-pensée: a way of bypassing binary thinking. Metaphysical, theoretical, psychoanalytical preoccupations fade in the face of the dreamlike, hallucinatory influx of scenes-sensations-emotions. The narrative resorbs the concepts that are never very far away. After Les Samouraïs, I wrote a series of "metaphysical detective stories,” which take the gamble of detecting where radical evil — that is, killing and murder — comes from. In The Enchanted Clock, set in Versailles and in contemporary astrophysics, the main character is Time.

 

*

F.N.: You have moved around intellectually a lot, unlike thinkers who spend their whole lives on a single concept and write variations on it. You look like a migrant who moves through identities, thoughts and writings, even though we recognize your touch, the Kristeva’s touch. When you think back to the early years, the 1970's, marked by hyper theory, the Tel Quel years, which some people are violently rejecting today, how do you look at these beginnings? With nostalgia, irony, pride?

 

Secondary question: Even if it's much too early, do you care about your intellectual legacy?

 

J.K.: In the 1970s I laid the foundation for what I called Transvaluation and Refoundation or Winning Back. Like all advances that revolt against conformism and stereotypes, this research (theoretical or literary) is susceptible to take hermetic, jargonized forms or, on the contrary, to be enclosed in politically correct ideologies.

Nevertheless, the epistemological necessity of Transvaluation and Refoundation calls to us today as we face the collapse or radicalization of ideologies, and find our political systems reduced to statistic management and to “calculation thinking." The media’s on-going spectacle and digital technology, which at the same time flatten, standardize and fragment, reject this questioning thought; or rather, they ignore it. But the approach I am talking about nevertheless manages to break through the lock-down of thought, which is worsening in these times of pandemic.

I have had to innovate and deepen my conception of psychoanalysis to accompany the inner experience of my patients in pandemic suffering (whether the sessions be in-person or remote). The unspeakable "traumas" and even the "central phobic nucleus" can find a working through and revive the psychic space of the analysand. I’d like to refer you to my position in the debate held at the initiative of the IPA posted on my site under the title "Psychoanalysis is a struggle for life,” in discussion with Virginia Ungar and Dominique Scarfone.”

 

Are you speaking of my "intellectual legacy"? I don't have one, not really. I am drawing up a will for my son and my copyrights. But as far as my thinking is concerned, let's keep in the open, in the space of transvaluation and refoundation.                                                        

*

 

F.N.: Debates on feminism are again very active, and involve generational conflicts. Is your reflection, both psychoanalytical and feminist, revived by the current demands for new rights, or by the communitarian conflicts over a feminism considered too white, too Western?

 

Secondary question:

How do you analyze the increasing public interest in sexual transition? What does it reveal about gender representation? Is it a symptom of social change?

 

J.K.: Some of the authors of the LLP volume have echoed criticisms made concerning my interest in the philosophy of the Enlightenment, my attachment to Europe, or my supposedly “white” and “essentialist” “feminism.” I respond to these suspicions and attacks with a maximum of details and sincerity in the LLP book. I thus refer you to my opening of the 51st IPA congress held in London in June 2019, entitled "Prelude for an Ethics of the Feminine,” where I take on the impossible mission of defining the “feminine," saying that "the feminine is the Higgs boson of the unconscious:” that is to say, just as the Higgs boson is untraceable but indispensable to the existence of matter, so is the feminine to the existence of psychic life. And I develop why "the feminine is transformative.” While I was writing this text, Miglena Nikolchina ended her contribution to the LLP volume by arguing that "Kristeva is a thinker of change.” How am I a thinker of change?

I argue, along with Tocqueville and Arendt, that something happened in Europe and nowhere else: we cut ties to religious tradition. Not to deny it (although, alas, some people do, and I fight them on it); but to question identities and values, and in doing so, endorse the risks of freedom. Freedom for women, men, children, slaves, the oppressed, the disabled. Whatever these identities and values are, and wherever they come from, those of the East, of the West, those of the Bible, the Gospels, the Koran, Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, humanism, feminism, etc., without taboo. In this spirit, I do not accept that post-colonialism should become an angry face-to-face between executioners and victims, guilt and revenge. There is no remedy for the identity clashes that shake democracies — this binary war between women and men, whites and blacks, radicalized sovereign-isms on both sides, — without the slow and indispensable process of transvaluation and winning back of identities and values. We must undertake and continue this process without respite at school, at university, in the media, on social networks, in families, in associations, in politics...

Texts by Ed Casey, Robert Harvey, Alina Feld, Elaine Miller — to name just a few of the participants in this process — bear witness to this. I should add that my seminar The Need to Believe developed from my work with the staff at the Cochin Hospital’s Maison des Adolescents, where we deal with teen-agers brain-washed into jihad and others whose need to believe devastates them to the point of suicide, vandalism, anorexia... I recall this in response to those who accuse me of sharing some supposed French colonial obsession with Islam... Faced with political Islam France is not retrograde. France is ahead in its awareness of radicalization: of its roots and its challenges.

As for Europe, I am proud to be a part of it despite its weaknesses, even its possible disintegration: Europe is not yet done in, but without it, multilateralism risks tumbling into mayhem. And since one is never more European than when one laughs at Europe, I’ll refer you to Daniel Cohn-Bendit's text in the LLP volume. After a very serious analysis of my Europeanism, he points out, tongue-in-cheek, that we are both followers of the Europe of Football, of European football. And I’ll add another joke in a similar vein: Bulgarian semioticians invented a cosmopolitan soccer team — as are all soccer teams world-wide — in which I am the only woman. Next to Cristiano Ronaldo, Thomas Sebeok, Umberto Eco and of course Thalès de Millet.

As for the sexual transition, you mentioned, dear François, two remarks. First, the problem is heterosexuality. Will the two sexes die, each on its own, as Alfred de Vigny wrote and Marcel Proust repeated? The second problem arising from this is that of the reconstituted family (which I develop in my study Metamorphosis of Parenthood SPP colloquium, 73rd CPLF colloquium, May 2013, which you can find on my site). Where has the father gone? I end with a metaphor by evoking Jackson Pollock's paintings which bear the title One (a reference to the unity of the creator, of the father), where there is no identifiable, representational "image" and any possibility of “unity”  is pulverized in the “dripping." It is important to accompany each family project, adoption, filiation, with personalized attention on a case-by-case basis. As always? No, more than ever before.

 

*

F.N.: What does the US mean to you? From the beginning, you have been welcomed here like a rock star. Have you thought about moving here? What do you like about the US and what don't you like?

 

Secondary question: More generally, what surprises you today?

 

J.K: I have often thought about moving to the United States, or rather to Canada, since French is the language I live and think in. Especially in times when a sovereignist ideology has held sway in France. The language, and my family, in particular, irrevocably attach me to France and what I call its openness to the multiverse. However, the United States remains my horizon. I share Hannah Arendt's diagnosis about US: extraordinary political freedom, on the one hand; heavy social obstacle on the other. The result is the recent cracks in democracy, but also the resistance of legal foundations. Multilateralism needs both the economic and libertarian power of American democracy and its exemplary educational system. At the same time, by balancing the US alliance with Europe, we could negotiate with the appetites of the Chinese giant from a position of strength and address the immensity of its culture. Beyond politics and economics, I’m talking, more profoundly, about conceptions of the individual, the social bond, and the freedoms that the conflict of civilizations puts to test.

What surprises me?

The immeasurable destructiveness of the speaking beings that we are does not surprise the psychoanalyst. I know that we are destroying the planet and I am not surprised that the most panicked are preparing to plant skyscrapers on Mars. In the meantime, we'd better vaccinate all earthlings against Covid-19 and its cousins, who will surely show up.

What surprises me, in the sense that surprise is the wellspring of philosophy — and as far as I am concerned this arouses joy, grace and serenity — is the capacity of women and men to survive, to bounce back, to re-found themselves and to start anew. I plan to have inscribed on my tombstone, on the Ile de , a phrase by Colette: “Rebirth has never been above my strength".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 

 

 

 

 

Thinking with Julia Kristeva : Conversation entre Julia Kristeva et François Noudelmann

 

A Webinar hosted by

La Maison Française, New York University

 

On the occasion of the publication of The Philosophy of Julia Kristeva, ed. Sara G. Beardsworth, in The Library of Living Philosophers, Open Court Publishing Company, 2020 and of At the Risk of Thinking: An Intellectual Biography of Julia Kristeva, by Alice Jardine, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

François Noudelmann : The fabulous book dedicated to your work has been published in the series The Library of Living Philosophers. When critics try to define you, they hesitate between psychoanalyst, semiotician, writer, and philosopher. Of course, you are all of these definitions and more, but could you say something about your identification with, or relationship to, philosophy? Even if there is not a single definition of philosophy, could you say what role it has played, through major or minor philosophical references, in your thinking?

 

Secondary question: There are not many women in philosophy. Does being a woman philosopher imply adopting a phallic writing?

 

Julia Kristeva : Cher François Noudelmann,  avant de répondre à votre question, d’abord un grand merci de nous recevoir par Zoom dans cette belle maison française que je connais depuis un demi-siècle déjà, et dont vous exercez la direction avec beaucoup de tact et d’énergie. Merci à toutes celles et à tous ceux qui sont intervenus depuis trois heures déjà, et dont je viens de recevoir avec beaucoup d’émotion et de gratitude les paroles, discutant et prolongeant ma recherche. Ce fut une véritable expérience de « pensée avec », qui manque beaucoup à l’accélération anthropologique imposée par le numérique et plus encore par la pandémie.

 

Je voudrais remercier d’abord les auteures des deux livres qui nous réunissent aujourd’hui.

En premier lieu, l’extraordinaire intelligence, précision et persévérance de Sara Gay Beardsworth, éditrice du gros volume de plus de 800 pages, auquel ont participé trente-six auteurs : philosophes, linguistes, sociologues, anthropologues, sans oublier quelques imminentes figures des arts et des lettres, de la politique aussi. Certains en direct, d’autre en podcast. Vos contributions, chers amis, vos pensées, éloges ou critiques, m’honorent, m’intimident et m’obligent. Et je suis fière de participer à cette prestigieuse série de la Library of living philosophers établit en 1939. A côté des grands noms de la philosophie, qui inspirent la recherche philosophique contemporaine : et tout particulièrement dans le petit groupe des trois philosophes français qui sont honorés par cette série, à savoir Sartre, Ricoeur et Gabriel Marcel, étant moi-même, désormais, une des rares femmes de la liste.

 

Et le deuxième livre, At the risk of thinking d’Alice Jardine, cette patiente et vigilante intellectual biography que tu m’as consacrée, chère Alice, publiée par Bloomsbury Press, et dans laquelle tu me fais revisiter, avec beaucoup de finesse et de lucidité, ma vie et ma recherche, mes amours et ma maternité. Nous nous sommes connues depuis mes premiers enseignements au département de French and Romance linguises de Columbia University. Tu étais ma première assistante américaine, aux côtés des professeurs Michael Rifleterre et Léon Roudiez qui dirigeaient le prestigieux département. Et déjà avec la présence fidèle, qui ne s’est jamais démentie, de Columbia University Press avec Jenifer Crew qui la dirige maintenant, et Lary Kritzman avec sa collection European perspective. C’est grâce à eux que mon écriture est devenue accessible en anglais dans la globalisation, rendant ainsi possible notre rencontre aujourd’hui. Je ne pourrais te remercier mieux, chère Alice, qu’en révélant, à nos amis ici présents, la face intime de notre amitié c’est-à-dire David Joyaux, le fils que nous avons avec Philippe Sollers, et qui se souvient toujours que quand il m’accompagnait bébé pendant mon semestre de permanant visiting professor à Colombia, c’est toi qui lui a appris à chanter « twinkle twinkle little star ». Et aujourd’hui ton livre se termine par un poème de David intitulé « L’Ecriture ».

*          *

*

Je reviens à votre question cher François. Avant de lire votre dernier livre Un tout autre Sartre (Gallimard, 2020), j’ai beaucoup aimé vos Pensée avec les oreilles et les airs de famille : une philosophie des affinités, ainsi que Le toucher des philosophes : Sartre, Nietzsche et Barthes au piano. Vous m’avez généreusement accueillie à France Culture, nous avons échangé fréquemment à la sortie de nos livres en librairie, et je peux dire que quelque différent que soient nos chemins, c’est bien une authentique « affinité » qui nous relie, ce Zoom en est une confirmation supplémentaire.

 

Je repends votre question. Je ne suis pas une philosophe professionnelle diplômée. Je garde encore mes cahiers d’étudiante en philologie française à l’Université de Sofia, recopiant studieusement des pages et des pages du Dictionnaire philosophique Voltaire, ou du Neveu de Rameau ou de Jacques le Fataliste de Diderot, ou encore de La Nouvelle Héloïse, du Contrat Social ou des Confessions de Rousseau. Les Lumières Françaises m’ont appris que la philosophie est inséparable de ce dévoilement du langage et de l’imaginaire que l’on appelle « littérature ». Le matérialisme dialectique que l’on nous enseignait ne se contentait pas des Cahiers dialectique de Lénine, je lisais aussi la Phénoménologie de Hegel et j’ai continué à approfondir ma connaissance de Hegel en écrivant ma thèse sur La révolution du langage poétique, qui porte en exergue une phrase de la Phénoménologie : « Dans l’étude scientifique ce qui importe donc c’est de prendre sur soi l’effort tendu de la conception » [1] . La psychanalyse devait m’apprendre que « l’effort tendu de la conception » est porté par l’investissement psycho-sexuel conscient et inconscient.

 

J’ai découvert Husserl en France, Les révolutions poétique du langage en témoigne, et je le discute au fur et à mesure que j’élabore mes notions de sémiotique versus symbolique. Marian Hobson en parle dans l’étude qu’elle consacre à ma recherche dans le volume LLP.

 

Je ne connaissais pas Freud ; en fouillant dans la bibliothèque familiale, ma sœur à découvert que mon père avait caché tout en haut, dans la dernière rangée du dernier rayon, tout contre le mur, la traduction bulgare de L’introduction à la psychanalyse de 1917, traduite en bulgare en 1947. Il ne fallait surtout pas le lire, pour ne pas devenir ennemi du Peuple ! J’ai découvert Freud à partir des séminaires de Lacan, auxquels n’avait amené Philippe Sollers. C’est Sollers aussi qui m’a fait lire Nietzsche.

Ce parcours devait me conduite nécessairement au démantèlement de l’ontothéologie, d’abord plus proche de la transvaluation des valeurs (Umwertung aller Werte) selon Nietzsche, et surtout dans le sillage du second Heidegger à ce qu’il appelle Verwiudung – traduit en français par « appropriation », voire « tournure ».

A l’écoute de « l’association libre » et du « transfert » selon Freud, mais aussi attentive à la littérature, - l’interprétation que j’essaie de construire n’est pas une « herméneutique ». Je cherche à faire entendre « l’expérience intérieure » au sens de Georges Batailles, c’est-à-dire « appropriation de la vie jusqu’à la mort » et « contestation du repli sur soi », des « identités », et des « limites ». Serait-ce ce que la kabbale juive appelle Techouva, le retournement de l’être ?

Le frayage (Bahuung en allemand) de la pensée ainsi comprise, est inséparable de l’écriture au sens où celle-ci absorbe l’imaginaire et implique le transfère. Mes néologismes (intertextualité, abjection, reliance, etc…) ne viennent pas « sous-titrer » des « abstractions » qui leur préexistent. J’essaie d’inviter ceux ou celles à qui je m’adresse à participer à la gestation de l’idée, en passant par ce que j’appelle la chair des mots : pulsions, affects, sensations, émotions.

 

Mes premiers écrits théoriques étaient plus spéculatifs. Suite à ma propre maturation psycho-sexuelle, et avec la psychanalyse, ma manière de penser cohabite désormais plus explicitement avec l’écriture littéraire : l’exposé académique cède la place à l’essai ; tandis que la théorisation psychanalytique s’étaye sur des vignettes cliniques où la parole de l’analysant et de l’analyste ni ne juge ni ne calcule mais se contente de transformer (comme le fait le rêve selon Freud dans L’interprétation des rêves).

 

Qu’est-ce qu’une « écriture phallique » dites-vous ? Celle qui légifère, ordonne, sanctionne, du pur « symbolique » garant de la structure et de la vérité ? L’écriture comme expérience, tournure, techouva, ou refondation est pour le moins bisexuelle, à la fois mise en ordre et polyphonie, traversée des frontières. Le féminin de l’homme et le féminin de la femme y participent et s’y révèlent, mais subordonnés à un seul objectif refonder : la singularité. Au sens de Dun Scot (mort en 1308) qu’Hannah Arendt a découvert dans le séminaire de Heidegger. Singularité ou Ecceitas : cet homme-ci, cette femme-là. Je voudrais citer la conclusion à cet égard, de ma trilogie Le génie féminin : « Chaque sujet invente dans son intimité un sexe spécifique », disons singulier. La pensée, quand elle existe, rend cette particularité, cette singularité partageable.

 

*          *

*

F.N. : Looking back on your work, we are very impressed by your power of thought. You have, in every theoretical field, in every kind of writing, invested maximum intensity: you go all the way, methodically, whether in language theory, in psychoanalytical interpretation, in the biographical understanding of a personality or a work of art... What libido sustains your endless desire to think, write and communicate? What is your engine, your fuel?

 

Secondary question: what determines your choice to write a theoretical essay or rather a novel?

 

J.K. : Peut-être le fait que je ne me reconnais pas dans cette Kristeva que vous venez de dessiner à grands traits généreux. Je ne me retrouve pas dans l’image ou le phénomène, je me voyage. Mais vous pouvez reformuler votre question : pourquoi vous vous voyagez-vous ?

 

La « evidence based medecine », qui explique tout par les « big data », trouvera peut-être que j’ai une « higth sensitive brain » ? Les psychanalystes freudiens chercheront du coté de l’intensité des pulsions et des capacités de sublimation, grâce à un Œdipe réussi, avec double intégration du pole paternel et du pole maternel. En effet, les deux livres qui nous réunissent aujourd’hui, ma biographie en conversation avec Samuel Dock et la biographie par Alice Jardine, mentionnent ces interminables discussions familiales, où je combattais la foi orthodoxe de mon père en m’appuyant sur le darwinisme de ma mère. Mon père se mettait en colère, mais il soutenait aussi que les seules valeurs ce sont les livre ; et qu’il n’y a pas d’autre moyen de « sortir des intestins de l’Enfer » (citation des Evangiles, prétendait-il, désignant ainsi notre Bulgarie natale) que d’apprendre les langues étrangères. L’éducation communiste était sévère, mais solide et j’avais la chance d’être adolescente pendant la période du dégel, c’est-à-dire la déstalinisation. Autre chance : la France qui m’a accueillie avec une bourse d’étude n’était pas sursaturée d’étrangers et j’ai été reçue sans préjugés – ni xénophobe, ni antiféministe – aussi bien à l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes, qu’à l’Université de Paris VII Denis Diderot qui m’a ouvert ses portes et où je suis devenue professeure, ou à Saint Germains des Prés, la revue Tel-Quel de Philippe Sollers. Cette hospitalité ne m’a pas épargné les micros-signes du nationalisme français, mon livre Etrangers à nous même témoigne de l’expérience de l’Etrangère (c’est le titre de l’article désormais célèbre que Barthes a écrit sur moi). Mais l’esprit universaliste habite profondément la pensée du peuple français, j’en suis persuadée. Et je parie sur ce perpétuel débat politique qui, tout compte fait, laisse de la place à l’étrangère que je suis et que je resterais. La preuve : ce Zoom est impossible en France, il est domicilié (hosted) à la Maison Française, mais à …. New York. La preuve, s’il en est une, que je suis profondément cosmopolite : « je me voyage ». Dans le contexte de la pandémie, je dis que je suis une sur-vivante. Non pas au sens morbide du terme, mais au sens de ce que Freud appelait : « l’éternel Eros », en terminant son Malaise dans la civilisation.

Pour le dire autrement, ce parcours, exil compris, s’appuie, s’étaye, sur une érotisation de la pensée. Oserai-je dire que la pensée ainsi comprise, avec la chair des mots, fait partie de mes organes sexuels ?

 

Les romans ? Une variation nocturne de l’a-pensée : je l’écris a-pensée. Les préoccupations métaphysiques, théoriques, psychanalytiques s’estompent devant l’afflux onirique, hallucinatoire de scènes-sensations-émotions. Et la narration, le récit résorbe les concepts qui ne sont jamais très loin. Après Les Samouraïs, j’ai écrit une série de « polars métaphysiques », qui font le pari de savoir d’où vient le mal radical, c’est-à-dire la mise à mort, le meurtre. Dans L’Horloge enchantée, qui se passe à Versailles et dans l’astrophysique contemporaine, le personnage principal est le Temps.

 

*          *

*

 

F.N. : You have moved around intellectually a lot, unlike thinkers who spend their whole lives on a single concept and write variations on it. You look like a migrant who moves through identities, thoughts and writings, even though we recognize your touch, the Kristeva’s touch. When you think back to the early years, the 1970's, marked by hyper theory, the Tel Quel years, which some people are violently rejecting today, how do you look at these beginnings? With nostalgia, irony, pride?

 

Secondary question: Even if it's much too early, do you care about your intellectual legacy?

 

J.K. : Les années 70 sont fondatrice de cette pensée que j’ai appelée Transvaluation et Retournement. Comme toutes les avancées révoltées contre les conformismes et les stéréotypes, ces recherches (théoriques ou littéraires) ont pu prendre des formes hermétiques, jargonnantes ou, au contraire, être enfermées dans des idéologies politicaly corrects.

Il m’empêche que la nécessité épistémologique de la Transvaluations et du Retournement s’impose aujourd’hui, face à l’écroulement ou à la radicalisation des idéologies, et face au politique réduit à une gestion à coups de statistiques, à la « pensée-calcul ». La médiatisation spectaculaire et le numérique, qui à la fois aplanissent, standardisent et fragmentent, rejettent en effet cette pensée questionnante ; ou plutôt, ils l’ignorent. Mais l’approche dont je parle parvient néanmoins à percer le confinement de la pensée, qui s’aggrave en temps de pandémie.

Et j’ai pu pour ma part développer ma conception de la psychanalyse, qui s’innove et s’approfondit, dans l’accompagnement de l’expérience intérieur en souffrance pandémique, entre séances présentielles et distancielles. Les « traumas » indicibles et jusqu’au « noyau phobique central » peuvent trouver une perlaboration, et faire revivre l’espace psychique des analysants. Je vous renvoie à mon site et à un débat qui s’est tenu à l’initiative de l’IPA sous le titre « La psychanalyse est un combat pour la vie, discussion avec Virginia Ungar et Dominique Scarfone ».

Vous me parlez de ma « intellectual legacy » ? Je n’en ai pas, pas vraiment. Je fais un testament pour mon fils et mes droits d’auteure. Mais concernant ma pensée, restons dans l’ouvert, la transvaluation et le retournement.

*          *

*

 

F.N. : Debates on feminism are again very active, and involve generational conflicts. Is your reflection, both psychoanalytical and feminist, revived by the current demands for new rights, or by the communitarian conflicts over a feminism considered too white, too Western?

 

Secondary question:

How do you analyze the increasing public interest in sexual transition? What does it reveal about gender representation? Is it a symptom of social change?

 

J.K. : Certains auteurs du volume LLP ont fait échos à des critiques qu’on a pu formuler concernant mon intérêt pour la philosophie des Lumières, mon attachement à l’Europe, ou encore à mon « féminisme » qui serait « white » et « essentialiste ». Je réponds à ces soupçons et attaques avec un maximum de détails et de sincérité dans le livre LLP. Je vous renvoie ainsi à mon ouverture du 51 congrès de l’IPA qui s’est tenu à Londres en Juin 2019, et qui s’intitule « Prélude pour une éthique du féminins », où j’assume la mission impossible de définir le « féminin », en disant que « le féminin est le boson de Higgs de l’inconscient » : c’est-à-dire introuvable mais indispensable à l’existence de la matière, en l’occurrence indispensable à l’existence de la vie psychique. Et je développe pourquoi « le féminin est transformatif ». Pendant que j’écrivais ce texte, Miglena Nikolchina achevait sa contribution au volume LLP en argumentant que « Kristeva is a thinker of change ». Comment ?

 

Je soutiens, avec Tocqueville et Arendt, qu’un événement s’est produit en Europe et nulle part ailleurs : on a rompu le fil avec la tradition religieuse. Non pour la dénier (bien qu’hélas certains pratiquent ce déni, et je les combats) ; mais pour questionner les identités et les valeurs aux risques de la liberté. Liberté des femmes, des hommes, des enfants, des esclaves, des opprimés, des sexes, des handicapées. Quelles que soient ces identités et ces valeurs, et d’où qu’elles viennent, celles de l’Est, de l’Ouest, celles de la Bible, des Evangiles, du Coran, du Taoïsme, du Confucianisme, du Bouddhisme, de l’humanisme, du féminisme, etc… sans tabou. Dans cet esprit, je n’accepte pas que le post-colonialisme se crispe en un face-à-face coléreux entre bourreaux et victime, culpabilité et revanche. Il n’y a pas d’autre remède aux heurts identitaires qui secouent les démocraties, à cette guerre binaire entre femmes et hommes, blancs et noirs, souverainismes radicalisés de part et d’autre, – sans le lent et indispensable processus de transvaluation et de retournement des identités et des valeurs dont je me réclame. A entreprendre et continuer sans relâche à l’école, à l’université, dans les médias, sur les réseaux sociaux, dans familles, les associations, les Etats…

 

Les textes de Ed Casey, Robert Harvey, Alina Feld, Elène Miller – pour ne citer que quelques-uns des participants de ce processus, et toutes les interventions depuis tris heures aujourd’hui (Cécilia, Marian, Fanny, Rachel, Noëlle, Eva, Emilia) - en témoignent. J’ajoute que mon séminaire Le besoin de Croire travaille avec des collègues psychanalystes et le personnel soignant de la maison des adolescents de l’hôpital Cochin, où nous recevons des adolescents candidat au Djihad. Mais aussi d’autres dont le besoin de croire dévasté les conduit au suicide, au vandalisme, à l’anorexie… Je rappelle ceci en réponse à ceux qui m’accuse de partager je ne sais qu’elle obsession coloniale française par l’Islam… Face à l’Islam politique la France n’est pas rétrograde, la France est en avance dans la prise de conscience de la radicalisation : de ses racines et de ses défis.

Quant à l’Europe, je suis fière d’en être malgré ses faiblesse, voir son délitement possible : l’Europe n’est pas encore K.O., mais sans elle le multilatéralisme risque de tomber dans le chaos. Et puisque on n’est jamais plus Européen que quand on rit de l’Europe, je vous renvoie au texte de Daniel Cohn-Bendit dans le volume LLP. Après une analyse très sérieuse sur mon européanisme, il s’appuie, en souriant, sur le fait que nous sommes tous deux adeptes de l’Europe du foot : du foot européen, du soccer. Et j’ajoute une autre blague dans le même esprit : les sémioticiens bulgares on inventé une équipe de foot cosmopolite, comme le sont toutes les équipes de soccer au monde, dans laquelle je suis la seule femme. A côté de Cristiano Ronaldo, Thomas Sebeok, Umberto Eco et bien sûr Thalès de Millet.

 

Quant à la transition sexuelle, que vous rappelez cher François, deux remarques. D’abord, le problème c’est l’hétéro-sexualité. Les deux sexes mourront-ils chacun de leur côté, comme l’écrivait Alfred de Vigny repris par Marcel Proust ? Et en même temps, le deuxième problème qui en découle, celui de la famille recomposée (que je développe dans mon étude les Métamorphose de la parentalité, colloque SPP, 73ème colloque CPLF, mai 2013, que vous pouvez trouver sur mon site). Où est passé le père ? Je finis par une métaphore en évoquant les tableaux de Jackson Pollock qui portent le titre One (un renvoyant à l’unité du créateur, du père) tandis qu’il n’y pas « d’image » identifiant une représentation : donc toutes « unité » est pulvérisée dans le « dripping ». Il importe d’accompagner chaque projet de famille, adoption, filiation, par une attention personnalisée au cas par cas. Comme toujours ? Non, plus que jamais.

*          *

*

F.N. : What does the US mean to you? From the beginning, you have been welcomed here like a rock star. Have you thought about moving here? What do you like about the US and what don't you like?

 

Secondary question: More generally, what surprises you today?

 

J.K. : J’ai souvent pensée à m’installer au Etats-Unis, ou plutôt facilement au Canada, le français étant la langue dans laquelle je vis et je pense. Surtout en période de poussée souverainiste en France. La langue, et surtout la famille, m’attachent définitivement à la France, à son autre face que j’appelle son ouverture au multivers. Pourtant, ce sont les Etats-Unis qui demeurent mon horizon. Je partage le diagnostic de Hannah Arendt : extraordinaire liberté politique, d’une part ; lourde pesanteur sociale de l’autre. Il en résulte les récents craquements de la démocratie, mais aussi la résistance des fondations juridiques. Le multilatéralisme a besoin de la puissance économique et libertaire de la démocratie américaine, et de son système éducatif exemplaire. En équilibrant l’alliance des Etats-Unis avec l’Europe, nous pourrions négocier en position de force les appétits du géant Chinois et aborder l’immensité de sa culture. Je ne parle pas seulement des domaines politique et économique, mais plus profondément des conceptions de la personne, du lien social, et des libertés que le conflit des civilisations met à l’épreuve.

 

Qu’est-ce qui me surprend ?

L’incommensurable destructivité des êtres parlant que nous sommes ne surprend pas la psychanalyste. Je sais que nous sommes en train de détruire la planète et je ne m’étonne pas que les plus paniqués se préparent à planter des gratte-ciels sur Mars. En attendant on ferait mieux de vacciner tous les terriens contre la Covid-19 et ses cousins, qui ne manqueront pas de se manifester.

 

Ce qui me surprend, au sens où la surprise est à l’origine de la philosophie, et en ce qui me concerne elle suscite joie, grâce et sérénité, c’est la capacité des femmes et des hommes à survivre, à rebondir, à se refonder et à re-commencer. J’inscrirais sur ma tombe, à l’Ile de Ré, une phrase de Colette : « Renaitre n’a jamais été au-dessus de mes forces ».

 

 

 

 



[1] Hegel Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, La phénoménologie de l’esprit I, trad. Jean Hyppolite, Paris, France, Aubier-Montaigne, 1947, p. 54.

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


twitter rss